Biosphere 2 rainforest plants

Research that Makes an Impact

Every day at the University of Arizona, scientists and researchers are working across a variety of disciplines to create change. Home to more than 70 world-class research centers, institutes, laboratories, networks and programs, our work towards a better world is widespread.

Natural and social science research by our own nationally and internationally renowned scientists and by those we support has honed public understanding of climate, climate change and climate adaptation, particularly in semi-arid regions such as Arizona. The work we do on campus and in the community has given policymakers and natural resource managers the information they need to make decisions that protect lives, health, economies and landscapes in the Sonoran Desert and beyond.

Environmental research

From local to international issues, natural sciences to social sciences, our research digs deeper to unearth solutions.

Browse our Research Themes

From GreenFeed

Guide to the Arizona monsoon: Dust storms, lightning and safety tips for first-timers

You breezed through your first winter — we know, 75 degrees and sunny in January was tough — but you did it. You really liked spring, when you were able to get outside, and even though it's starting to get a little toasty now you're thinking you can handle summer. Because, really, how much hotter can it get?

Plant-Based Thanksgiving

Happy Turkey Week, Wildcats! It’s no secret that as populations and incomes increase around the world, agriculture and other food systems have been working hard to feed the world’s people. However, some food industries (specifically meat processing industries) have huge carbon footprints and emit carbon into the atmosphere at alarming rates. In fact, In fact, Diana Liverman, director of the School of Geography & Development, states that "people think about controlling greenhouse gas emissions, they usually think of fossil use, like having fewer coal-powered plants, or driving more fuel-efficient cars, but not many realize that the food system contributes to greenhouse gas emissions". Because pressure has been put on the United States and other countries to halve greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, these food production practices must change -- and we can start this week!

Some tropical forests show surprising resilience as temperatures rise

Scientists are finding that some percentage of tropical forests may hold up under global warming—if they’re not cut down.