Charrovida reopens with plant-based menu, philosophy

The pandemic has given some businesses, including Carlotta Flores’s year-old Charrovida restaurant on the northwest side, time to rethink their game plan.

Zoom meeting on computer

Recap of June 2020 Co-InFEWS Workshop

A recap of the Co-InFEWS Workshop hosted online during the week of June 15, 2020, where Indigenous community members, scholars and representatives from federal and tribal agencies met to collaborate on ideas and share experiences about the nexus of food, energy and water systems.

Alaskan megaeruption may have helped end the Roman Republic

For ages, the shadow of a volcano has hung over the fall of the Roman Republic. Ancient historians told of the Sun’s mysterious disappearance after Julius Caesar’s murder in 44 B.C.E., which was followed by bouts of cold and crop failures. Now, a team of scientists and historians has discovered that one of the largest known eruptions in history struck in 43 B.C.E.—potentially contributing to 2 years of weird weather and famine as the republic dissolved and the empire took shape.

UA professor’s research on Chinese rivers lands him three awards

University of Arizona history professor, UNESCO chair in Environmental History and former director of the UA's Global Studies Program David Pietz is in a class of his own, winning three prestigious titles rewarding him for his seminal research in Chinese water conservation. 

No end in sight for Asarco copper strike, but critical ruling lies ahead

The strike against Tucson-based copper producer Asarco by unions representing about 1,800 workers in Arizona and Texas is in its eighth month, with no talks underway or planned.