Population Ecology

Cecil R Schwalbe

Cecil
R
Schwalbe
Title: 
Assistant Professor, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Related Departments, Schools or Colleges and/or Program(s): 
Education: 
Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1981.
Phone: 
(520) 621-5508
Photo of Cecil Schwalbe
Environmental Themes: 

David L Rogowski

David
L
Rogowski
Title: 
Research Assistant (postdoctoral position), School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Related Departments, Schools or Colleges and/or Program(s): 
Education: 
Ph.D., Zoology, North Dakota State University, 2004.
Phone: 
(520) 307-4355

My research interests are fairly broad, but revolve around ecology and evolution, primarily in aquatic systems. In particular, I am interested in how organisms, and ultimately how populations respond to their environment. I am interested in the importance of biotic and abiotic factors in structuring populations and communities. Differential tolerances to stressors such as salinity, pollution, or even invasive species can have both direct an indirect effects within a community. How populations and communities respond to these stressors can provide insight into evolutionary processes. A good portion of my research has centered on the effects of stressors on aquatic populations and communities. My current research focuses on applied issues related to the conservation and management of aquatic resources. Ecological statistics play an important role in understanding patterns and relationships of species and habitats, and consequently I have a strong interest in the practical application of statistics.

My current research revolves around an invasive crayfish. For information on my other research interests please see my research web page. No native crayfish occur within Arizona, however northern crayfish (Orconectes virilis) have been introduced in a number of water bodies throughout the state. Northern crayfish predate on a variety of native species, fish, frogs, snakes, snails, as well as destroy aquatic vegetation. I am conducting a basic mark-recapture study of four populations. The information gathered will be used to construct population models to investigate how one can most effectively control or cause a population to go extinct, or whether it is even feasible.

Environmental Themes: 

John Koprowski

John
Koprowski
Title: 
Professor, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Additional Titles and Departments: 
Affiliate Faculty, Institute of the Environment
Education: 
Ph.D. in Biology, University of Kansas, 1991.
Phone: 
(520) 624-6439
Photo of John Koprowski

John Koprowski's research interests focus on the integration of basic ecological research into conservation and management decision making. He prefers to investigate basic ecological questions that have the potential to be applied to real-world problems in the conservation of biodiversity. As a result, many of his research group's studies focus on model species that are threatened or endangered or ecosystems that are rare or undergoing rapid change. His team enjoys collaborative work on a local, regional, national, and international scale and continuously seeks cooperators to investigate the impacts of climate change, population growth, and other anthropogenic influences.

Environmental Themes: