Plant Sciences

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John
C
Donoghue II
Degree Program: 
phd
Other Departments or Unit Affiliations: 

I am a PhD student in ecology at the University of Arizona where I also work as a Research Intern in Bioinformatics and Geospatial Analysis for an iPlant Seed Project on Botanical Geospatial Diversity Cyberinfrastructure. My research broadly centers on the topics of species diversity, biogeography and macroecology; in this realm I study patterns of species diversity, species distribution modeling, and am particularly interested in the mechanisms that both enable and constrain organisms to live where they do in the context of climate change. While some of my work is continental in scale across diverse organisms, a significant component is also targeted at understanding the limits of the distribution of Sonoran desert and Mojave Desert plant species. Before pursuing academic studies in ecology I worked for resource conservation agencies and later in the geographic information systems (GIS) field as programmer, specialist and project manager. So, I also have 15+ years of experience with information systems and GIS in both local and state government, non-profit, and private industry settings. I am a Certified GIS Professional by the GIS Certification Institute and an esri Certified ArcGIS Desktop Professional.

Topic or title of your dissertation/thesis: 

My dissertation centers on studies of the determinants of the distributions of organisms at a variety of scales. This effort is focused around the idea of understanding how distributions are constrained by biotic and abiotic processes so that we can begin to assess how the distributions of organisms may be influenced by climate change.

Expected Graduation Date: 
June, 2013

David Moore

David
J
Moore
Title: 
Associate Professor, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Additional Titles and Departments: 
National Phenology Network
Affiliate Faculty, Institute of the Environment
Education: 
PhD, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Univerity of Illinois, 2006
Phone: 
(520) 621 9998
David J. Moore

David Moore is a broadly trained plant ecologist and ecosystem scientist. His research centers on the changing role of forests in the carbon cycle and the controls of carbon use and allocation in plants and ecosystems. His research uses a broad range of observation types from ground measurements to satellite remote sensing and focuses of time series of ecosystem processes and the timings of transitions between ecosystem states both seasonally and interannually. After receiving his undergraduate degree in Botany at University College Dublin, David worked for the National Parks and Wildlife Service in Ireland, carrying out biological inventories of the stoney beaches of the Irish coast. He received his PhD from the University of Illinois working primarily at the Duke Forest Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment experiment in Chapel Hill, NC. In 2006/07 David was a postdoctoral researcher in Boulder, CO at the Co-operative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES). During that time he worked both at the University of Colorado and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) where he worked on integrating data from an eddy flux tower into an ecosystem model and also on the Airborne Carbon in the Mountain Experiment. He took a faculty position at King's College London in 2007 until 2011 and served as a visiting scientist to the Data Products group at the National Ecological Observatory Network in 2010/2011 before joining the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Arizona in 2011.

Environmental Themes: 

Thomas Wilson

Thomas
B
Wilson
Title: 
Lecturer, Soil, Water and Environmental Science
Additional Titles and Departments: 
Affiliate Faculty, Institute of the Environment
Related Departments, Schools or Colleges and/or Program(s): 
Education: 
Ph.D., Soil Chemistry, The University of Arizona, 2001.
Phone: 
(520) 621-9308
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My research emphasis has been on the impact of invasive species on ecosystems in the SW United States relative to fire frequency and soil chemistry. My current position emphasizes instruction and curriculum development.

Patricia Rorabaugh

Patricia
A
Rorabaugh
Title: 
Assistant Professor of Practice, School of Plant Sciences
Additional Titles and Departments: 
Affiliate Faculty, Institute of the Environment
Related Departments, Schools or Colleges and/or Program(s): 
Education: 
Ph.D., Plant Science, Utah State University, 1988.
Phone: 
(520) 626-9953
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I do not have a research component but teach 2 classes, PLS 217 and PLS 397B in which I discuss sustainable practices in greenhouse agriculture. These include sustainable/biodegradable growing media, use of beneficials to control pests in the greenhouse rather than using chemical pesticides, use of organic teas and compost beds for growing, etc. I have been at the UA since July 1990. I have worked on several research projects and for the last 12 years have been primarily teaching and doing extension/outreach work with a few research projects/affiliations with the UA's Controlled Environment Agriculture Center (CEAC), 1951 E. Roger Rd, Tucson, AZ.

Environmental Themes: 

Tanya Quist

Tanya
M
Quist
Title: 
Assistant Professor of Practice, School of Plant Sciences
Additional Titles and Departments: 
Director, UA Campus Arboretum
Affiliate Faculty, Institute of the Environment
Related Departments, Schools or Colleges and/or Program(s): 
Education: 
PhD, Plant Environmental Stress Physiology, Purdue University 2004.
Phone: 
(520) 621-1582
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Urban forestry and agriculture. Educational outreach, science literacy in the area of plant biodiversity, water conservation and sustainable landscape management.

David Galbraith

David
W
Galbraith
Title: 
Professor, School of Plant Sciences
Additional Titles and Departments: 
Professor, BIO5 Institute
Affiliate Faculty, Institute of the Environment
Related Departments, Schools or Colleges and/or Program(s): 
Education: 
Ph.D., Biochemistry, Cambridge University, 1977.
Phone: 
(520) 621-9153
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Plants comprise the foundation of all living organisms on this planet, a consequence of their exceptional ability to perform photosynthesis. Understanding plants is critical to the survival of the human race, and cytometry has a central role to play in this advancing this understanding. Urgency is increasingly provided given largely uncontrolled growth of the human population, the impact of which is resulting in the ongoing extinction of plant species. My research focuses on the use of cytometry, first,  to examine gene expression according to cell type and at the level of single cells, and, second, as a means to provide a complete molecular census of the angiosperms.

The first research area derives from the observation that land plants generally comprise complex multicellular tissues and organs, within which different cell types are interspersed. Analysis of gene expression requires recognition and separation of these different cell types. We have developed cytometric methods to achieve this separation and analysis, and have extended them to non-plant organisms, including mammals.

The second research area reflects the observation that the flowering plants (angiosperms) comprise approximately 500,000 species, including those that are well described and those that are presumed to exist but have not yet been discovered. We have developed methods of cytometry to rapidly and accurately characterize nuclear DNA contents, but so far, only about 1-2% of the angiosperms have been described in this way. We have therefore proposed a road-map aimed at a complete global census of nuclear DNA contents for the angiosperms, and its extension to cover survey sequencing and, ultimately, complete genomic sequencing.

Advances in scientific technologies have greatly facilitated the acquisition of large datasets of molecular and cellular information, to the extent that the biosciences are no longer limited by the process of data acquisition. Instead, rate-limiting steps are increasingly related to experimental design and sample acquisition and preparation, at the front end, and to data storage, transfer, and analysis, at the back end. Solving these issues will become an increasingly important facet of the scientific endeavor, and we are interested in exploring ways that lead to these solutions.

Steven E Smith

Steven
E
Smith
Title: 
Associate Professor, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Additional Titles and Departments: 
Associate Professor, School of Plant Sciences
Related Departments, Schools or Colleges and/or Program(s): 
Education: 
Ph.D., Plant Breeding, Cornell University, 1984.
Phone: 
(520) 621-5325
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My research is focused on the evolution of adaptation in plants. I have worked primarily with species found on grassland sites. A goal in my work is to link an understanding of plant growth and development processes with local adaptation and to understand the genetic basis for these processes.