Avian Ecology

Dominic D LaRoche

Dominic
D
LaRoche
Title: 
Wildlife Biologist, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Related Departments, Schools or Colleges and/or Program(s): 
Education: 
B.S., Ecology, Evolution, and Animal Behavior, University of Maryland, 2000.
Phone: 
(520) 626-8912
Photo of Dominic LaRoche

I graduated from the University of Maryland in 2000 with a degree in ecology, evolution, and animal behavior. I started my natural resources career at Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge where I participated in a number of studies including rocket netting and banding tundra swans, fish surveys, black bear hair snares, GIS work and general refuge management.

I first joined the Conway lab in 2002 as a research intern to work on a project banding and tracking band-tailed pigeons, conducting avian point counts, as well as nest searching and monitoring of ground nesting passerines in the Santa Catalina Mountains. I am currently a Wildlife Biologist working on several different projects. I enjoy living in Tucson and working in the diverse habitats that span from the Sonoran desert to the Sky Islands.

Interest and Expertise: 
Environmental Themes: 

Chris Kirkpatrick

Chris
Kirkpatrick
Title: 
Senior Research Specialist, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Related Departments, Schools or Colleges and/or Program(s): 
Education: 
MS, University of Arizona, 1999.
Phone: 
(520) 626-8983
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Interest and Expertise: 
Environmental Themes: 

Vicki Garcia

Vicki
Garcia
Title: 
Research Specialists, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Related Departments, Schools or Colleges and/or Program(s): 
Education: 
M.S., University of Arizona, 2005.
Phone: 
(520) 626-8293
Photo of Vicki Garcia

I currently work in the Conway lab on a variety of projects that deal with ecology and conservation of burrowing owls.  Current projects include:

  • Developing a management plan to conserve burrowing owls on a naval base in California that also supports California least terns (an endangered prey species)
  • Coordinating a Department of Defense project to determine whether burrowing owls are becoming less migratory and redistributing their numbers in favor of areas with irrigated agriculture
  • Examining how differences in the way a nesting attempt is defined in the burrowing owl literature influences estimates of nesting success
  • Examining the correlates of clutch size in burrowing owls
Interest and Expertise: 
Environmental Themes: 

TJ Fontaine

TJ
Fontaine
Title: 
Senior Research Specialist, School of Natural Resources and the Environment
Related Departments, Schools or Colleges and/or Program(s): 
Education: 
Ph.D., Fish and Wildlife Biology, The University of Montana, 2006
Phone: 
(402) 472-0339
Photo of TJ Fontaine

Broadly, my interest is evolutionary ecology, but my passion is understanding variation in life history strategies, both within and among species.  My dissertation research concentrated on the influence of juvenile mortality on the expression of reproductive strategies.  Particularly, how individuals occupying safer environments alter parental care strategies and reproductive effort.  Currently, I am examining the ecological conditions that influence stopover site selection for migratory birds.  Particularly how vegetative phenology, food availability and predation risk interact with individual condition to influence habitat choices and subsequent behaviors.

Environmental Themes: